Nesting Season For Eagles

In Tennessee, eagles in the wild typically start laying eggs Feb. 15 – 28. Our eagles at the American Eagle Foundation lay eggs about a month later. A flurry of nest-building activities precede egg laying – and then we anxiously await the laying of eggs and wait some more to determine if the eggs are fertile.  To see an archived version of our eagle cam at the American Eagle Foundation, follow this link.

In order to learn more about bald eagle nesting activities click on “National Bald Eagle Management Guidelines” by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.    You will find interesting and informative sections on:

  1. Where do Bald Eagles nest? page 4
  2. When do Bald Eagles nest? page 5
  3. Chronology of nesting activities in various parts of the U.S.  page 6
  4. How many chicks do bald eagles raise?  page 7
  5. What do bald eagles eat?  page 7
  6. Impacts of human activity on nesting, foraging and roosting bald eagles.  pp 7 – 8
  7. Recommendations for avoiding disturbance of nest sites.  pp 9 – 10
  8. Alternate nests.  page 11
— Carolyn4Eagles, contributor and Bob Hatcher
Advertisements

About carolyn4eagles

Webmaster, Eagles.org
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Nesting Season For Eagles

  1. nelson brooks ( yu nah ee tah) says:

    I am not commenting on a particular entry. I am not sure how to do blogs.

    If we are truly interested in saving our national symbol. of the eve of our Fourth of July – put this in your search engine – “Hydrilla UGA Eagles AVM” and see what you get.

    We here, in the Bald Eagle Death Capital of the World, have 11 dead bald eagles since November 2010. For every eagle found, some experts estimate 8 to 10 are lost in the woods. The first year that our eagles died, every monitored nesting site (except one) on the South Carolina side of the Clark Hill Lake on the Savannah River was wiped out.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s